So we decided to make a video that explains the first things traders need to know in an easy and accessible way. Demonstrating them in the Trading 212 app, trading expert David Jones guides you through the meaning of the first terms and actions that you'll come across. These are always at the base of the skills all knowledgeable traders have and need to take on the markets.
The recovery in risk appetite has caused weakness in the greenback and the yen. The EUR/USD pair is looking bullish due to the bullish recovery in risk sentiment. The resistance levels are 1.1517, 1.1570, and 1.1624. The support levels are 1.1328, 1.1269, and 1.1222. The USD/JPY pair is consolidating with both the currencies looking weak due to risk-on market sentiment. The resistance levels are 107.86, 108.23, and 108.54. The support levels are 106.43, 106.15, and 105.21. […]
Turnover of exchange-traded foreign exchange futures and options was growing rapidly in 2004-2013, reaching $145 billion in April 2013 (double the turnover recorded in April 2007).[57] As of April 2019, exchange-traded currency derivatives represent 2% of OTC foreign exchange turnover. Foreign exchange futures contracts were introduced in 1972 at the Chicago Mercantile Exchange and are traded more than to most other futures contracts.
Many currency pairs will move about 50 to 100 pips per day(sometimes more or less depending on overall market conditions). A pip (an acronym for Point in Percentage) is the name used to indicate the fourth decimal place in a currency pair, or the second decimal place when JPY is in the pair. When the price of the EUR/USD moves from 1.3600 to 1.3650, that's a 50 pip move; if you bought the pair at 1.3600 and sold it at 1.3650, you'd make a 50-pip profit.
One unique aspect of this international market is that there is no central marketplace for foreign exchange. Rather, currency trading is conducted electronically over-the-counter (OTC), which means that all transactions occur via computer networks between traders around the world, rather than on one centralized exchange. The market is open 24 hours a day, five and a half days a week, and currencies are traded worldwide in the major financial centers of London, New York, Tokyo, Zurich, Frankfurt, Hong Kong, Singapore, Paris and Sydney—across almost every time zone. This means that when the trading day in the U.S. ends, the forex market begins anew in Tokyo and Hong Kong. As such, the forex market can be extremely active any time of the day, with price quotes changing constantly.
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