High Risk Investment Notice: Trading Forex/CFDs on margin carries a high level of risk and may not be suitable for all investors. The products are intended for retail, professional, and eligible counterparty clients. Retail clients who maintain account(s) with Forex Capital Markets Limited ("FXCM LTD") could sustain a total loss of deposited funds but are not subject to subsequent payment obligations beyond the deposited funds but professional clients and eligible counterparty clients could sustain losses in excess of deposits. Prior to trading any products offered by FXCM LTD, inclusive of all EU branches, any affiliates of aforementioned firms, or other firms within the FXCM group of companies [collectively the "FXCM Group"], carefully consider your financial situation and experience level. The FXCM Group may provide general commentary, which is not intended as investment advice and must not be construed as such. Seek advice from a separate financial advisor. The FXCM Group assumes no liability for errors, inaccuracies or omissions; does not warrant the accuracy, completeness of information, text, graphics, links or other items contained within these materials. Read and understand the Terms and Conditions on the FXCM Group's websites prior to taking further action.


From a historical standpoint, foreign exchange trading was largely limited to governments, large companies, and hedge funds. But in today's world, trading currencies is as easy as a click of a mouse. Accessibility is not an issue, which means anyone can do it. Many investment firms, banks, and retail forex brokers offer the chance for individuals to open accounts and to trade currencies. 
Economic numbers: While economic numbers can certainly reflect economic policy, some reports and numbers take on a talisman-like effect: the number itself becomes important to market psychology and may have an immediate impact on short-term market moves. "What to watch" can change over time. In recent years, for example, money supply, employment, trade balance figures and inflation numbers have all taken turns in the spotlight.
Just like stocks, you can trade currency based on what you think its value is (or where it's headed). But the big difference with forex is that you can trade up or down just as easily. If you think a currency will increase in value, you can buy it. If you think it will decrease, you can sell it. With a market this large, finding a buyer when you're selling and a seller when you're buying is much easier than in in other markets. Maybe you hear on the news that China is devaluing its currency to draw more foreign business into its country. If you think that trend will continue, you could make a forex trade by selling the Chinese currency against another currency, say, the US dollar. The more the Chinese currency devalues against the US dollar, the higher your profits. If the Chinese currency increases in value while you have your sell position open, then your losses increase and you want to get out of the trade.
Investment management firms (who typically manage large accounts on behalf of customers such as pension funds and endowments) use the foreign exchange market to facilitate transactions in foreign securities. For example, an investment manager bearing an international equity portfolio needs to purchase and sell several pairs of foreign currencies to pay for foreign securities purchases.
Imagine a trader who expects interest rates to rise in the U.S. compared to Australia while the exchange rate between the two currencies (AUD/USD) is 0.71 (it takes $0.71 USD to buy $1.00 AUD). The trader believes higher interest rates in the U.S. will increase demand for USD, and therefore the AUD/USD exchange rate will fall because it will require fewer, stronger USD to buy an AUD.
The blender costs $100 to manufacture, and the U.S. firm plans to sell it for €150—which is competitive with other blenders that were made in Europe. If this plan is successful, the company will make $50 in profit because the EUR/USD exchange rate is even. Unfortunately, the USD begins to rise in value versus the euro until the EUR/USD exchange rate is 0.80, which means it now costs $0.80 to buy €1.00.
In this video, the Trader Guy looks at the cryptocurrency, bitcoin for the June 15th session. Bitcoin/USD — As you can see on the daily chart, the market is trading inside this ascending triangle pattern. The Friday's trading session was very quiet. The risk appetite got crushed on Thursday. To the downside, the 50-day EMA looks supportive. Further to the downside, the 50% Fib retracement level will offer support. The $10,000 level is psychologically significant […]
Welcome to our weekly trade setup ( EURCHF )! - 1 HOUR Turning bullish right now, good entries! 4 HOUR Following pa and pressure above main sr level. DAILY Overall bullish market, great entries and risk reward now. - FOREX SWING BUY EURCHF ENTRY LEVEL @ 1.07440 SL @ 1.06620 TP @ 1.08620 Max Risk. 0.5% - 1%! (Remember to add a few pips to all levels -...
How should a retail trader handle the market, when the market makes complicated moves? The currency pair may move by huge pips without a fundamental driver? In this situation, the market may seem to be confusing. For example, look at these announcements. There is a FOMC interest rate meeting scheduled, which is right after the good jobs number released earlier. But the market looks uncertain as to what to expect from the FOMC […]
In this video, the Trader Guy looks at the commodity, gold for the  June 15th session. Gold/USD — The $1,750 level is proving to be strong resistance, which is closer to the top of this consolidation zone. A candle close above the $1,775 level is seen as the breakout of this consolidation. Look for pullbacks closer to the $1,675 level for buying opportunities. The central banks like the Fed and the ECB are printing money. Also, this market […]
Currency and exchange were important elements of trade in the ancient world, enabling people to buy and sell items like food, pottery, and raw materials.[9] If a Greek coin held more gold than an Egyptian coin due to its size or content, then a merchant could barter fewer Greek gold coins for more Egyptian ones, or for more material goods. This is why, at some point in their history, most world currencies in circulation today had a value fixed to a specific quantity of a recognized standard like silver and gold.
International parity conditions: Relative purchasing power parity, interest rate parity, Domestic Fisher effect, International Fisher effect. To some extent the above theories provide logical explanation for the fluctuations in exchange rates, yet these theories falter as they are based on challengeable assumptions (e.g., free flow of goods, services, and capital) which seldom hold true in the real world.
As the risk sentiment deteriorates, the riskier assets look weak, while the greenback and the Japanese yen are looking strong. The EUR/USD pair is looking bearish with the 1.1222 level offering support. The resistance levels are 1.1277, 1.1330, and 1.1517. The support levels are 1.1222, 1.1155, and 1.1089. The USD/JPY pair is looking bearish with both the currencies looking strong due to risk-off sentiment dominating the market. The resistance levels are 107.86, […]
In this video, the Trader Guy looks at the cryptocurrency, bitcoin for the June 16th session. Bitcoin/USD — Bitcoin on Monday session, broke to the downside of this ascending triangle pattern. But the 50-day EMA offered strong support. As the Fed announced that it buys individual bonds of large companies, it caused the dollar to get crushed. You need to wait for a candle close above the $10,000 level, which is psychologically significant, for a long-term move […]

The Balance does not provide tax, investment, or financial services and advice. The information is being presented without consideration of the investment objectives, risk tolerance or financial circumstances of any specific investor and might not be suitable for all investors. Past performance is not indicative of future results. Investing involves risk including the possible loss of principal.
Risk Warning: Trading Forex and Leveraged Financial Instruments involves significant risk and can result in the loss of your invested capital. You should not invest more than you can afford to lose and should ensure that you fully understand the risks involved. Trading leveraged products may not be suitable for all investors. Trading non-leveraged products such as stocks also involves risk as the value of a stock can fall as well as rise, which could mean getting back less than you originally put in. Past performance is no guarantee of future results. Before trading, please take into consideration your level of experience, investment objectives and seek independent financial advice if necessary. It is the responsibility of the Client to ascertain whether he/she is permitted to use the services of the FXTM brand based on the legal requirements in his/her country of residence.  Please read FXTM’s full Risk Disclosure.
Foreign exchange fixing is the daily monetary exchange rate fixed by the national bank of each country. The idea is that central banks use the fixing time and exchange rate to evaluate the behavior of their currency. Fixing exchange rates reflect the real value of equilibrium in the market. Banks, dealers, and traders use fixing rates as a market trend indicator.
The foreign exchange market (Forex, FX, or currency market) is a global decentralized or over-the-counter (OTC) market for the trading of currencies. This market determines foreign exchange rates for every currency. It includes all aspects of buying, selling and exchanging currencies at current or determined prices. In terms of trading volume, it is by far the largest market in the world, followed by the credit market.[1]
Currency futures contracts are contracts specifying a standard volume of a particular currency to be exchanged on a specific settlement date. Thus the currency futures contracts are similar to forward contracts in terms of their obligation, but differ from forward contracts in the way they are traded. In addition, Futures are daily settled removing credit risk that exist in Forwards.[78] They are commonly used by MNCs to hedge their currency positions. In addition they are traded by speculators who hope to capitalize on their expectations of exchange rate movements.
What is Bank of England buybacks? For example, look at this announcement on the screen. There is an announcement of 1.5 billion buyback of bonds with a offer to cover ratio of 3.17 times. This is 3 times more guilds on offer for the bank to buy than the bank was willing to buy from the market. The success of the buyback is based on the offer to cover ratio. The bond buying program is also called as quantitative easing. The bank […]

As the risk sentiment deteriorates, the riskier assets look weak, while the greenback and the Japanese yen are looking strong. The EUR/USD pair is looking bearish with the 1.1222 level offering support. The resistance levels are 1.1277, 1.1330, and 1.1517. The support levels are 1.1222, 1.1155, and 1.1089. The USD/JPY pair is looking bearish with both the currencies looking strong due to risk-off sentiment dominating the market. The resistance levels are 107.86, […]


In the forex market currencies trade in lots, called micro, mini, and standard lots. A micro lot is 1000 worth of a given currency, a mini lot is 10,000, and a standard lot is 100,000. This is different than when you go to a bank and want $450 exchanged for your trip. When trading in the electronic forex market, trades take place in set blocks of currency, but you can trade as many blocks as you like. For example, you can trade seven micro lots (7,000) or three mini lots (30,000) or 75 standard lots (750,000), for example.
×